Southwest Archery Tiger Takedown Bow

While a great recurve bow will let you choose a draw weight to suit your needs, most don’t let you choose a size. 60-inches is the standard, but nobody told Southwest Archery Supply that. The Tiger Takedown bucks that trend by giving you three sizes to go along with an interesting choice in draw weights. […]

Last updateAugust 16, 2018
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Southwest Archery Tiger Takedown Bow

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While a great recurve bow will let you choose a draw weight to suit your needs, most don’t let you choose a size. 60-inches is the standard, but nobody told Southwest Archery Supply that. The Tiger Takedown bucks that trend by giving you three sizes to go along with an interesting choice in draw weights.

The Tiger is another bow with a style similar to the Samick Sage. It was also designed by some team members from the company but uses the lovely Tigerwood in place of the layered approach.

This bow will definitely draw a few stares on the range, and the performance is top-notch whether you roll with the Tiny Tiger or the full-sized 62-inch bow.

Before we get to sizes, let’s talk about the construction…

The riser is tapped so you can outfit it with any accessory you choose, but there’s one difference between we feel needs to be pointed out. In photos, you may see a model with brass bushings while others show black bushings. After reaching out to the manufacturer, we learned that only the older models have brass, and all the newer recurve bows will have black taps.

The limbs are made from maple with the usual amount of black fiberglass facing, and they’re reinforced to boot. You can use Fast Flights or any string you’d like, and they’re easy to attach as well thanks to knobs. While they aren’t flush, you can leave the hex tool behind and swap out limbs in less than a minute.

The draw weight depends on which model you choose.

And, guess what?

The same goes for the size.

The aptly named Tiny Tiger is only 48-inches with a 14-pound draw weight but looks just like its larger siblings. The Little Tiger clocks in at 54-inches, but you’ll get a bit more variety with the draw weights. It’s still not in the hunting class however at 16, 20 or 25 pounds.

Last but not least is the Tiger, which is a bit larger than other bows on our list at 62-inches.

Unfortunately, the draw weight tops out at 29 pounds on this bow and dips down to 16 pounds in 4-pound increments. All are available in right or left-handed models and are as accurate as you’d expect once you get them properly dialed in.

The Tiger series of takedown recurve bows are eye-catching and an outstanding option for a practice bow. They shoot well and are easy to tune in although the draw weight limits you unless you choose the full-sized model which “may” be able to take a larger limb if you find one to fit the pocket.

All versions come with a 1-year warranty, a Dacron bow string, an adhesive arrow rest and instruction manual.

Features

  • Available in three sizes
  • Tapped for accessories
  • Tool-less limbs
  • Reinforced limb tips
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